The New Home

As I had mentioned in my previous post my wife and I (along with our now 3.5 year old daughter) have recently become residents of the State of Utah. Around September of last year my daughter and I made the 12 hour drive from southern New Mexico up here in a U-Haul, leaving behind a flat barren wasteland to discover what would become our newer (and greener) home. Unlike New Mexico, this place has seasons. Winter, which has always been a favorite of mine actually happens here. I had begun to forget what snow looked and felt like since in southern New Mexico, it was usually in the mid sixties around Christmas time, and a 1/8” of frost on the ground was grounds for schools closing. Now of course, come winter we’ll see sites like this one:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/earthquakephotography/14113853033/

The cool thing about this part of Utah is largely how close we are to the foot of a mountain range and the ability to get out and explore in a fairly reasonable fashion. Another sweet option and something my wife was quite excited about is that the housing we live in is where at least some of the Winter Olympians from the 2002 games stayed (it’s actually why they built these apartments). So we can see all the oddly out of place remnants of the Olympics and their impact.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/earthquakephotography/14268424271

One of my favorite things here is the view. Given how high up we are at the base of the mountain, on a clear day you can see the Great Salt Lake along the horizon. At night, you get some really awesome sunsets, such as these:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/earthquakephotography/14269668462

https://www.flickr.com/photos/earthquakephotography/14085193707

https://www.flickr.com/photos/earthquakephotography/14400685783

I suppose I should mention our visitors. Given the proximity of campus to the wilderness, we often get deer and other such things roaming around the lot or right on the other side of the fence like this fella:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/earthquakephotography/14248629816

Sadly these rats-with-hooves are still much too skittish around people so getting close isn’t really an option. Of course that’s why they invented the zoom lens I suppose. Of course, the birds here seem to give very few shits regarding your proximity. Like this guy:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/earthquakephotography/14052820428

I was actually close enough I could have punched it right in the face. I think it was too full from the infinite worms it just wolfed down to put up a fight. He had accepted his decisions and subsequent fate.

 

Lastly, and I will simply only mention once as I can’t for the life of me figure out why it matters. I take most of my pictures on a Nikon D3200 with either a 16-55mm or 55-200mm lens and vary rarely a tripod. In almost every photography blog or social media post I see, people often spend more time talking about the camera they use rather than the photos themselves. Who cares? I don’t care about your FPS or maximum ISO rating. I want to know why you thought that zoomed in photo of a cow butt was a good idea. Just because you used a $1,500 Zeiss lens doesn’t negate the fact that you’re a weirdo. QED.

-D

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